SEMINARS/LECTURES

ALL ABOUT ROPE offers one or two day seminars that are intended for anyone involved with rope rescue. It should be mandatory for team leaders, safety officers, riggers, instructors, SWAT or SWAT medics and anyone involved in confined space rigging. The program is designed to provide you with the information and data you don’t receive in the classroom. In class we learn by rote. We learn how to do it, but not why we do it. Our goal is to provide you with the tools to answer the question “why?”

Download Seminar Outlines: Seminar Day One Seminar Day Two

Our seminars includes the following:

THE NFPA STANDARDS AND THE CONFUSION WITHIN THE FIRE SERVICE

This presentation addresses NFPA 1983, 1670, 1006 and 1500 as they apply to rope rescue in the fire service and the mis-conceptions that we have with these standards. It looks at how these standards are interpreted by team leaders and instructors and how they affect the decisions made by firefighters and their rescue teams. It provides interpretations by NFPA committee chairmen or NFPA staff liaisons. It offers insight concerning the NFPA stance on single rope techniques, the use of belays, safety factors, one and two person rope and much more.

In 2005, this presentation received an award for the most informative presentation at the International Technical Rescue Symposium.

 
   

 

CARABINER ROLLOUT AND DESCENT DEVICES

This is an in depth look at a presentation given by Peter Popall of Petzl at the 2003 International Technical Rescue Symposium. Mr. Popall gave a very informative examination of conditions that can lead to carabiner failure. This presentation offers further insight into this phenomenon and concludes with a solution to the problem based on testing and the use of safer and less expensive equipment.

 

 

HOW STRONG IS THAT ROPE?

Many of us are concerned about the strength of our rope, when in fact there are other factors to consider when discussing rope failure. Law enforcement and military personnel will enjoy this discussion of rope vs. firearms and rope vs. glass or knives.

FORCES CREATED IN RESCUE SYSTEMS

This topic has never been addressed in such depth before. This presentation offers instructors, safety officers, riggers and rescuers the data they need to critically analyze their systems. This is not something you learn in class. This data was collected over time and should be of great benefit to any rescue team. We discuss the forces created with a couple of belay techniques both at the anchor and at a change of direction, we discuss the forces created on tripods rigged in different configurations, the forces created when using a 2 point anchor system and one of the anchors fails, the forces created with elevated anchors and low anchors with a 90 degree break over and much, much more.

FALL FACTORS MYTH OR REALITY

This presentation changed the way progressive rescuers view fall factors as they apply to rescue rope. This presentation was given at the 2000 International Technical Rescue Symposium and challenged the belief that fall factors were the same for high stretch climbing ropes and low stretch rescue ropes. They are not. This was confirmed by 3 presentations in the following 2 years. Two of the papers were written by Chuck Weber who is the Quality Manager and ISO Coordinator for PMI Ropes. He has a BS in Civil Engineering from Georgia Tech. The 3rd paper was presented by Stephen Attaway who has a Master of Science in Civil Engineering and a Ph.D in Computational Mechanics. He is also a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

NEVER STEP ON A ROPE

In many classes, if a student steps on a rope, they are warned against doing it again. If they step on the rope a 2nd time they are expected to “buy the class a round”. With an introduction like this, students learn that stepping on a rope is a very serious matter. To help put this in perspective, have you ever heard of a student being told they owe the class “a round” because of an improperly operated belay? Probably not, but most of us are familiar with the taboo associated with stepping on a rope. This presentation analyzes this taboo and offers data and critical thinking to challenge this belief.

PRUSIK GUARD

A short presentation that can turn any pulley into a prusik minding pulley at virtually no cost, and eliminate prusiks being sucked into the system.

 

ONE INCH TUBULAR WEBBING

This presentation showcases the benefits of using one inch tubular webbing in a wrap 3 pull 2 configuration and the built in safety factor that has never been discussed before. This testing also highlights a discrepancy with a highly regarded rescue book concerning the strength of this rigging.

A 2nd presentation on webbing discusses different rigging configurations with one inch tubular webbing and the surprising results of the residual strength it maintains after failure. It concludes with a discussion of cut webbing being tested and the data that testing generates.

BOTTOM BELAY TESTING

This discusses the effectiveness of a bottom belay on long rappels. This controversial technique had never been researched before and many people blindly relied on this technique. Those who were slightly skeptical requested the biggest and strongest members of their group to perform their bottom belay. When presented at the 2003 International Technical Rescue Symposium this presentation received an award for “Best New Research”.

UV DEGRADATION

What effect does sunlight, fluorescent light or prolonged outdoor exposure have on one inch tubular webbing or PMI 8mm accessory cord? Our test pieces were exposed for 122 consecutive days. During that period there were 43 days with the temperature in the 80’s, 17 days with the temperature in the 90’s and 60 days with the UV index in the high range of 7 or above.

ROCK-N-RESCUE HEAVY DUTY
ANCHOR STRAPS

We tested 8 brand new and 3 used anchor straps in the basket, girth hitch and end to end configuration. The basket and girth hitches were tested around an 8” X 5” steel I beam with a ¼” thick flange. No padding was used to protect the anchor straps. This presentation explains where the failures occurred and examines the cause of those failures.

This seminar also provides additional interesting and surprising data on equipment used by many rescue teams and includes safety and rigging tips that can be put to use immediately.

Each participant will also receive a 40 page notebook filled with data from the research and testing presented during the seminar.

Additional presentations available from ALL ABOUT ROPE:

TOWER CLIMBING FOR RESCUE WORK

This presentation will focus on tower climbing for rescuers and will compare traditional lead climbing to the use of lanyards as a safety while climbing.
A lead climb is recognized as a means to protect a sport climber from falling, while lanyards are usually associated with work positioning. This presentation also addresses the use of lanyards to enhance the safety of a rescuer by offering both positioning and to a degree, fall protection.

TOWERS AND ANTENNAS THE RESCUE AND THE INJURIES

This presentation will focus on tall tower emergencies and how they are handled by EMT’s and Paramedics. It discusses accessing the victim, victim treatment and victim packaging and how all of this affects the “golden hour”. Unfortunately, very few firefighters have ever worked on a tower and even fewer incident commanders. This presentation offers rescuers and the incident commander and idea of what to expect and what not to expect at a tall tower rescue.